In Sweden, Anti-Globalizationists Dominate Public Discourse, Econ Profs Do Little

Econ Journal Watch (2004), 1(1): 175–184

10 Pages Posted: 18 Sep 2013 Last revised: 30 Sep 2013

See all articles by Per Skedinger

Per Skedinger

Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN); Linnaeus University - School of Business and Economics

Dan Johansson

Örebro University School of Business

Abstract

In recent years, globalization and its consequences have become hotly debated issues. In Europe, non-governmental organizations like Attac have argued that free trade and free capital movements favor large corporations and rich countries, while poor countries are treated unfairly. These ideas have gained wide-spread attention in the media. But globalization is also a large research area in economics, so there is a golden opportunity for economists to disseminate their knowledge to the interested public. In this article, we investigate to what extent Swedish professors, with publications in the relevant fields of research, actually take part in the public discourse on globalization. We find that the professors are virtually absent in the debate and we discuss possible causes and consequences of this inactivity.

Keywords: role of economists, globalization

JEL Classification: A11, A14, F02

Suggested Citation

Skedinger, Per and Johansson, Dan, In Sweden, Anti-Globalizationists Dominate Public Discourse, Econ Profs Do Little. Econ Journal Watch (2004), 1(1): 175–184, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2327492

Per Skedinger

Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN) ( email )

Box 55665
Grevgatan 34, 2nd floor
Stockholm, SE-102 15
Sweden

HOME PAGE: http://www.ifn.se/PerS

Linnaeus University - School of Business and Economics ( email )

VÄXJÖ, SE-351 95
Sweden

Dan Johansson (Contact Author)

Örebro University School of Business ( email )

School of Business
Örebro, SE-70182
Sweden

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