The Constitution and the Regulation of New Reproductive Technologies

in Overview of Legal Issues in New Reproductive Technologies, Volume 3 of the Research Studies of the Royal Commission on New Reproductive Technologies (Ottawa: Supply and Services Canada, 1994) 1-84.

84 Pages Posted: 20 Sep 2013

See all articles by Martha Jackman

Martha Jackman

University of Ottawa - Common Law Section

Date Written: 1994

Abstract

This paper discusses the implications of the Constitution Act, 1867 and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms for the regulation of new reproductive technologies (NRTs). Part 1 of the paper considers the impact of the constitutional division of powers on the regulation of NRTs, and suggests that NRTs are susceptive to extensive regulation by the federal government. Part 2 discusses the impact of the Charter on regulation of NRTs, particularly whether sections 7 and 15 protect the right to parenthood, equal access to NRTs, or the rights of non-parent stakeholders. Part 3 considers the possible impact of future constitutional arrangements on the regulation of NRTs.

Keywords: Canada, Canadian, law, legal, constitution, Charter of Rights, regulation, new reproductive technologies, assistive, federal, parenthood, section 7, section 15, Charter

Suggested Citation

Jackman, Martha, The Constitution and the Regulation of New Reproductive Technologies (1994). in Overview of Legal Issues in New Reproductive Technologies, Volume 3 of the Research Studies of the Royal Commission on New Reproductive Technologies (Ottawa: Supply and Services Canada, 1994) 1-84.. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2327596 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2327596

Martha Jackman (Contact Author)

University of Ottawa - Common Law Section ( email )

57 Louis Pasteur Street
Ottawa, K1N 6N5
Canada

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