Funded Experience: Selznick's Vision of JSP and the Unfinished Agenda of the Interdisciplinary Movement in Legal Education

Issues in Legal Scholarship, Volume 10, Issue 1 (Dec 2012)

Posted: 25 Oct 2013

See all articles by Jonathan Steven Simon

Jonathan Steven Simon

University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall, School of Law

Date Written: December 2012

Abstract

The late Philip Selznick was one of the leading sociologists of the 20th century and a founder of the modern law and society movement. At Berkeley, where he taught from 1958 until his retirement in 1982, Selznick created two institutions that are taken to be emblematic of the rise of law and social science and the interdisciplinary study of law: in the last third of the 20th century, the Center for the Study of Law & Society (founded in 1961); and, with Law Dean Sanford Kadish, the Jurisprudence and Sociology program (JSP), in 1977. Today, amidst signs that Oliver Wendell Holmes’ famous prediction that law would eventually belong to the man of statistics and the master of economics”2 is being realized (more than a century after he made it), Selznick’s vision for JSP is a reminder of the untapped potential of what we may call the "interdisciplinary movement" in law, for transforming the preparation of law students for practice and professional life, and of reconstructing graduate preparation for academic careers in law.

Suggested Citation

Simon, Jonathan Steven, Funded Experience: Selznick's Vision of JSP and the Unfinished Agenda of the Interdisciplinary Movement in Legal Education (December 2012). Issues in Legal Scholarship, Volume 10, Issue 1 (Dec 2012). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2343840

Jonathan Steven Simon (Contact Author)

University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall, School of Law ( email )

310 Barrows Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
United States
510.643.5169 (Phone)

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