Hubble Bubble Trouble: The Need for Education about and Regulation of Hookah Smoking

Journal of Public Policy & Marketing: Spring 2011, Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 119-132

14 Pages Posted: 8 Nov 2015

See all articles by Merlyn Griffiths

Merlyn Griffiths

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Greensboro - Bryan School of Business & Economics

Tracy Harmon-Kizer

Syracuse University - Whitman School of Management; University of Dayton

Mary Gilly

University of California, Irvine - Paul Merage School of Business

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: October 25, 2011

Abstract

A Middle Eastern tradition, hookah smoking involves burning flavored tobacco heated by charcoal, creating smoke that is filtered through water and ingested through the mouth using a hose. Hookah lounges are increasingly locating around college campuses in the United States, and websites offering hookah paraphernalia target U.S. high school and college students. In two studies involving interviews with college-age hookah smokers and analysis of website marketing practices, the authors investigate consumer beliefs and attitudes toward hookah smoking and the way it is portrayed online. The findings indicate that it is a social phenomenon, with young people introducing peers to the practice and websites promoting shared consumption experiences. Contrary to medical evidence, young people believe smoking sweetened tobacco through a hookah is nonaddictive and safer than cigarettes. Hookah lounges often are exempt from age restriction laws because many double as caf├ęs and other eating establishments. Traditional tobacco warnings are not present in lounges or on websites. The findings highlight potential health dangers of hookah smoking and the need for education regarding this practice and demonstrate that regulatory oversight is needed.

Suggested Citation

Griffiths, Merlyn and Harmon-Kizer, Tracy and Harmon-Kizer, Tracy and Gilly, Mary, Hubble Bubble Trouble: The Need for Education about and Regulation of Hookah Smoking (October 25, 2011). Journal of Public Policy & Marketing: Spring 2011, Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 119-132 , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2345351

Merlyn Griffiths

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Greensboro - Bryan School of Business & Economics ( email )

401 Bryan Building
Greensboro, NC 27402-6179
United States

Tracy Harmon-Kizer (Contact Author)

Syracuse University - Whitman School of Management ( email )

721 University Avenue
Syracuse, NY 13244-2130
United States

University of Dayton ( email )

Dayton, OH 45469
United States

Mary Gilly

University of California, Irvine - Paul Merage School of Business ( email )

Paul Merage School of Business
Irvine, CA California 92697-3125
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
11
Abstract Views
247
PlumX Metrics