On the Prospects of Raising the Originality Requirement in Copyright Law: Perspectives from the Humanities

Journal of the Copyright Society of the USA, vol. 60, no. 3 (Spring 2013), p. 387-443.

Amsterdam Law School Research Paper No. 2013-62

Institute for Information Law Research Paper No. 2013-05

59 Pages Posted: 31 Oct 2013 Last revised: 13 Feb 2014

Erlend Lavik

University of Bergen

Stef van Gompel

University of Amsterdam - Institute for Information Law (IViR)

Date Written: October 30, 2013

Abstract

In 1903, in Bleistein v Donaldson Lithographing, Justice Holmes famously concluded that judges are ill-suited to make merit judgments when determining the eligibility for protection of works. Subsequent courts and commentators have generally followed his caution. Yet, no one has thought through how the copyright system would work were Justice Holmes not heeded. What if courts were called upon to determine the aesthetic merit of a work? How would they go about it? And would they be able to separate the gold from the dross by drawing upon an aesthetic evaluation of such kind?

These questions inevitably arise upon reading some recent proposals to raise the originality threshold. Though it is rarely explicitly recognized, the reconfiguration that these proposals entails would effectively bring originality’s meaning in copyright law more into line with how the term is used in aesthetics, where it is considered a function of the work’s level of creativity, measured by its degree of departure from conventional expression.

Drawing on the concept of domain from sociocultural studies of creativity, we explain just why it would be so enormously problematic for courts to identify and to apply a stricter originality criterion that would require them to make decisions on the basis of merit. By comparing the domain of copyright law to the domain of patent law, we argue that it is the latter’s relative coherence and orderliness that enables patent examiners to get traction when assessing an invention’s degree of non-obviousness. The cultural domain, by contrast, is less rule-bound, and therefore non-obviousness is much harder to establish and validate. Aesthetics – both as a set of cultural practices and products and as an academic discipline – are simply too heterogeneous to provide adequate toehold for the legal analysis of higher degrees of originality.

Exploring the reasons and reasoning behind the ban on aesthetic merit in copyright law from a humanities perspective, this article offers a more detailed and nuanced account of Justice Holmes’ conclusion. Contrary to conventional wisdom we argue that the inherent subjectivity of aesthetic preferences does not in itself make it any harder to pinpoint an objective standard of aesthetic merit, though it does make it harder to provide justification for any such standard. Furthermore, the article questions the premise on which the proposal to raise the originality threshold rests, namely that it will cause the undeserving bottom of works to fall out, leaving only aesthetically worthy and socially valuable works protected. Before introducing a stricter originality criterion we need a more careful and empirically based analysis of just what the problems are, what areas of copyright law are affected, and exactly how and why a higher threshold would improve the situation.

Keywords: copyright, originality, creativity, nonobviousness, patent law, aesthetics, orderliness of domains, merit judgments, subjectivity, Bleistein.

JEL Classification: K11, 031, 034

Suggested Citation

Lavik, Erlend and Gompel, Stef van, On the Prospects of Raising the Originality Requirement in Copyright Law: Perspectives from the Humanities (October 30, 2013). Journal of the Copyright Society of the USA, vol. 60, no. 3 (Spring 2013), p. 387-443.; Amsterdam Law School Research Paper No. 2013-62 ; Institute for Information Law Research Paper No. 2013-05. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2347361

Erlend Lavik (Contact Author)

University of Bergen ( email )

Muséplassen 1
N-5008 Bergen, +47 55 58
Norway

Stef Van Gompel

University of Amsterdam - Institute for Information Law (IViR) ( email )

Kloveniersburgwal 48
Amsterdam, 1012 CX
Netherlands

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