Ontario and the Direct Access Model to Human Rights

22 Arguments for Human Rights Institutions in Canada, eds. S. Day, L. Lamarche, K. Norman, Irwin Law, Forthcoming

22 Pages Posted: 14 Dec 2013 Last revised: 4 Jan 2014

See all articles by Michelle Flaherty

Michelle Flaherty

University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law

Date Written: October 31, 2013

Abstract

The measure of our society depends not only on the vigour of the language it uses in human rights law, but also on whether individuals have real access to meaningful enforcement of those rights. While Ontario has long had relatively robust human rights statutes, its ongoing challenge has been to create an effective mechanism for enforcing those rights. This chapter, excerpted from "22 Arguments for Human Rights Institutions in Canada", looks at Ontario's direct access model to human rights and whether the legislative changes have improved access to fair and effective human rights enforcement. As a current member and former vice-chair of the Tribunal, I was involved in the Tribunal's work from 2008 to present. While the Tribunal continues to strive to meet these challenges, it has seen considerable success and has successfully transitioned to a direct access model for human rights.

Keywords: human rights, human rights law, direct access model, Ontario, rights, enforcement, Ontario Human Rights Commission, self-represented, amendments, reform

Suggested Citation

Flaherty, Michelle, Ontario and the Direct Access Model to Human Rights (October 31, 2013). 22 Arguments for Human Rights Institutions in Canada, eds. S. Day, L. Lamarche, K. Norman, Irwin Law, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2348370

Michelle Flaherty (Contact Author)

University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law ( email )

57 Louis Pasteur Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5
Canada

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
188
rank
157,739
Abstract Views
627
PlumX Metrics