A House Haunted by Justice: Eichmann in Jerusalem

Flessas, T., A House Haunted by Justice: Eichmann in Jerusalem, Law Text Culture, 9(1), 2005.

32 Pages Posted: 6 Nov 2013

See all articles by Tatiana Flessas

Tatiana Flessas

London School of Economics - Law Department

Date Written: 2005

Abstract

Hannah Arendt's account of the trial of Adolf Eichmann has haunted commentators since it was first published in 1963. The meaning of the trial, as a foundational event for the State of Israel, and the meaning of the trial as a point of visibility for the hundreds of witnesses, is endlessly examined in the literature on Eichmann in Jerusalem. The ghosts of the people lost to the Nazi regime haunt the trial, as do the voices of the witnesses, and the desires and efforts of the prosecutor, the judges, and Eichmann himself. Like all texts, Eichmann in Jerusalem is haunted as a matter of course, is made up of invisible and inaudible participants among the words that can be read and re-read. This essay is a meditation on the hauntings within this text, from within the genre of haunted literature. It reads Eichmann in Jerusalem as, finally, a ghost story.

Keywords: Arendt, Eichmann, Justice, ghost, M R James, theatre

Suggested Citation

Flessas, Tatiana, A House Haunted by Justice: Eichmann in Jerusalem (2005). Flessas, T., A House Haunted by Justice: Eichmann in Jerusalem, Law Text Culture, 9(1), 2005.. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2349319

Tatiana Flessas (Contact Author)

London School of Economics - Law Department ( email )

Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

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