The Practice of Japan in International Law, 1961-1970

78 American Journal of International Law 733 (1984) Br3-84

2 Pages Posted: 8 Nov 2013

Date Written: November 7, 1984

Abstract

A nation's influence upon the content of international law is largely a function of the complete and rapid dissemination of its state papers and the sophistication of the international legal practitioners in its foreign office. The positions a state takes on international legal matters, and the manner in which it describes and justifies its positions, constitute the most readily accessible evidence of its state practice as a component of customary law. Therefore, one would imagine that all states would place a high premium upon the dissemination of their official practice in the international community.

Suggested Citation

Gross, Leonard and D'Amato, Anthony, The Practice of Japan in International Law, 1961-1970 (November 7, 1984). 78 American Journal of International Law 733 (1984) Br3-84. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2351360 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2351360

Leonard Gross

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale - School of Law ( email )

1150 Douglas Drive
Carbondale, IL 62901-6804
United States
618-453-8770 (Phone)

Anthony D'Amato (Contact Author)

Northwestern University - Pritzker School of Law ( email )

375 E. Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60611
United States

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