Not All Incentives Wash Out the Warm Glow: The Case of Blood Donation Revisited

23 Pages Posted: 16 Nov 2013

See all articles by Joan Costa-Font

Joan Costa-Font

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE)

Mireia Jofre-Bonet

City University London - Department of Economics

Steven T. Yen

University of Tennessee - Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: November 2013

Abstract

The issue of the nature of the altruism inherent in blood donation and the perverse effects of financial rewards for blood giving has been recently revisited in the economic literature with limited consensus. As Titmuss ([Titmuss, Richard M., 1970]) famously pointed out, providing monetary incentives to blood donors may crowd out blood supply as purely altruistic donors may feel less inclined to donate. In this paper we examine how favouring different types of incentives is related to the likelihood of donating blood by exploiting a large sample representative of the population of fifteen European countries that contains information on both donation and attitudes towards incentives. Our results show that those who favour monetary rewards for blood donation are less likely to be donors and those who favour non‐monetary rewards are more likely to have donated. This is consistent with the idea that while monetary rewards may crowd out blood donation, non‐monetary rewards do not.

Suggested Citation

Costa-Font, Joan and Jofre-Bonet, Mireia and Yen, Steven T., Not All Incentives Wash Out the Warm Glow: The Case of Blood Donation Revisited (November 2013). Kyklos, Vol. 66, Issue 4, pp. 529-551, 2013, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2355567 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/kykl.12034

Joan Costa-Font (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://https://joancostaifont.org/

Mireia Jofre-Bonet

City University London - Department of Economics ( email )

Northampton Square
London, EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

Steven T. Yen

University of Tennessee - Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics ( email )

Knoxville, TN 37996-4518
United States

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