The Derecognition Approach: Government Illegality, Recognition, and Non-Violent Regime Change

58 Pages Posted: 19 Nov 2013

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

This Article proposes that the international community should actively use recognition policy as a novel way of dealing with repressive regimes in the international system. Specifically, states and international organizations should consider the derecognition of dictatorial regimes that face mass non-violent opposition from their population and that choose to meet this opposition with violence rather than reform. Such a program is justified by the illegality of the regimes in question and is predicated on the principle that non-violent, diplomatic intervention — and even regime change — is preferable to full-scale military intervention in dealing with such situations, particularly as a first step. Derecognition is advanced as a non-violent approach to intervention, a concept which could incentivize peaceful domestic resistance as opposed to violence and potential civil war. The subject is particularly relevant given events in the Middle East since 2011 and the various attempts by dictatorial regimes to violently suppress popular revolution in, most notably, Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Bahrain, Yemen, and Syria.

Keywords: Public International Law, Recognition, Revolution, Regime Change, Intervention, Responsibility to Protect

Suggested Citation

Auron, Danny, The Derecognition Approach: Government Illegality, Recognition, and Non-Violent Regime Change (2013). George Washington International Law Review, Vol. 45, No. 3, 2013. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2356596

Danny Auron (Contact Author)

CHRGJ ( email )

245 Sullivan St
New York, NY 10012
United States

Fordham University ( email )

113 West 60th Street
New York, NY 10023
United States

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