The Political Economy of Race, 1940-1964: The Adoption of State-Level Fair Employment Legislation

40 Pages Posted: 23 Aug 2000

See all articles by William J. Collins

William J. Collins

Vanderbilt University - College of Arts and Science - Department of Economics; The Brookings Institution; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: June 2000

Abstract

This paper traces the diffusion of fair employment legislation at the state level and evaluates the relative importance of various demographic, political, and economic factors in the promotion (or at least the acceptance) of the principle of government-enforced anti-discrimination policy. The empirics indicate that non-southern states with higher proportions of union members, Jews, and Catholics tended to adopt fair employment legislation sooner than other states. There is weaker evidence that after controlling for other characteristics, the likelihood of passage was lower in states dominated by the Republican Party and that there were spillover or contagion effects across states. The proportion of the population that was black does not appear to have shortened the time to adoption.

Suggested Citation

Collins, William J., The Political Economy of Race, 1940-1964: The Adoption of State-Level Fair Employment Legislation (June 2000). NBER Working Paper No. h0128. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=235686

William J. Collins (Contact Author)

Vanderbilt University - College of Arts and Science - Department of Economics ( email )

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The Brookings Institution

1775 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036-2188
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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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