No More Solitude? Workers' Conditions and Rights in Latin America During the Great Recession

17 Pages Posted: 20 Nov 2013 Last revised: 29 Aug 2014

Date Written: November 19, 2013

Abstract

Latin American countries deregulated much less than the United States and Europe during the Great Recession. Perhaps the country with the most the most deregulation was Mexico, where some categories of employment contracts now no longer require cause for termination and where back pay awards have been capped. However, the region buttressed labor inspection. Many countries modernized their labor courts. Collective bargaining rights were expanded in at least Mexico and Uruguay. In about a decade, the middle class grew by 50% in the region, from 100 million people to 150 million people. The economies also maintained a general growth trend despite the crisis. Growth with equity prevailed against the grain of the Washington Consensus and neoliberal formulas. We need more time to conclude that the region has reached a new dawn, but the picture remains positive.

Keywords: Latin America, Great Recession, labor rights, collective bargaining, labor inspection, labor courts

JEL Classification: K19, K23, K31

Suggested Citation

Rosado Marzán, César F., No More Solitude? Workers' Conditions and Rights in Latin America During the Great Recession (November 19, 2013). Employee Rights and Employment Policy Journal, vol. 17, no. 2 (2013): 291-307, Chicago-Kent College of Law Research Paper No. 2013-48, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2357156

César F. Rosado Marzán (Contact Author)

University of Iowa College of Law ( email )

Melrose and Byington
Iowa City, IA 52242
United States

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