Download this Paper Open PDF in Browser

A Defence of Raphael Lemkin's Definition of Genocide: To What Extent, If at All, Has the Definition of Genocide Developed Since Lemkin's Initial Conception of It?

20 Pages Posted: 23 Nov 2013 Last revised: 26 Nov 2013

Samantha Morgan Williams

University College Cork - School of Law; Independent

Date Written: December 22, 2012

Abstract

Raphael Lemkin is credited with the neologism of genocide, however since his death the definition has developed as both the occurrence of genocides and international law and politics progressed. As a direct result, appreciation of Lemkinā€™s work has suffered, with few paying more than lip service to him, looking instead to newer academics such as the writings of Fein, Charny, Chalk and Johansson. While it is obvious that the definition and our understanding of genocide have progressed this author proposes, notwithstanding some basic omissions, that genocide remains largely as was defined by Lemkin in 1933 in the Madrid Conference and in 1945 in Axis Rule in Occupied Europe. It is this initial conception and its relationship to the present definition that this essay will mainly concern itself with, asking to what extent if any the definition of genocide has developed since Lemkin.

Keywords: genocide, Lemkin, Raphael Lemkin, Axis Rule in Occupied Europe, Definition of Genocide, Fein, Chalk, Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide

Suggested Citation

Williams, Samantha Morgan, A Defence of Raphael Lemkin's Definition of Genocide: To What Extent, If at All, Has the Definition of Genocide Developed Since Lemkin's Initial Conception of It? (December 22, 2012). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2358551 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2358551

Samantha Williams (Contact Author)

University College Cork - School of Law ( email )

College Road
Cork, County Cork
Ireland

Independent ( email )

Paper statistics

Downloads
156
Rank
163,007
Abstract Views
777