The Shadow Zones of International Judicialization

C. Romano, K. Alter and Y. Shany, eds., The Oxford University Press Handbook of International Adjudication, Oxford University Press, 2013, pp. 90-110

Loyola-LA Legal Studies Paper No. 2013-45

22 Pages Posted: 19 Dec 2013  

Cesare P.R. Romano

Loyola Law School Los Angeles

Date Written: December 17, 2013

Abstract

Despite the plethora of international adjudicative bodies created over time and across regions, international judicialization is still remarkably uneven. First, while some regions of the globe contain multiple, overlapping, international adjudicative bodies, others have none. Second, patterns of utilization are inconsistent. Even where international adjudicative bodies exist, certain actors use them more frequently than others. Third, certain areas of international relations have been judicialized significantly more than others. This chapter describes the current state of judicialization along these three main dimensions, highlighting the areas and issues where judicialization has not arrived, and advances some possible explanations for this puzzle.

Suggested Citation

Romano, Cesare P.R., The Shadow Zones of International Judicialization (December 17, 2013). C. Romano, K. Alter and Y. Shany, eds., The Oxford University Press Handbook of International Adjudication, Oxford University Press, 2013, pp. 90-110; Loyola-LA Legal Studies Paper No. 2013-45. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2369119

Cesare P.R. Romano (Contact Author)

Loyola Law School Los Angeles ( email )

919 Albany Street
Los Angeles, CA 90015-1211
United States

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