Using Cross-Practice Collaboration to Meet the Evolving Legal Needs of Local Food Entrepreneurs

28 A.B.A. Nat. Resources & Env. (2013)

5 Pages Posted: 20 Dec 2013

See all articles by Emily Broad Leib

Emily Broad Leib

Harvard Law School

Amanda L. Kool

Harvard University, Law School - Faculty, Transactional Law Clinics

Date Written: December 18, 2013

Abstract

Consumers are increasingly interested in where and how the food they purchase is produced, as evidenced in part by rising demand for locally sourced products. While various entrepreneurs desire to capitalize upon this emergent demand, those entrepreneurs must overcome a range of legal obstacles in order to do so, including both general legal barriers and barriers specifically related to growing or selling food products. This article addresses how lawyers can utilize a model of cross-practice collaboration to comprehensively and effectively address the challenges faced by local food entrepreneurs, thus allowing these entrepreneurs to enter new markets and foster improved food system outcomes. This article draws upon experience gained through a cross-practice collaboration between two Harvard Law School clinics — the Food Law and Policy Clinic and the Community Enterprise Project of the Transactional Law Clinics — that aims to provide comprehensive assistance to food truck entrepreneurs in Boston.

Suggested Citation

Broad Leib, Emily and Kool, Amanda L., Using Cross-Practice Collaboration to Meet the Evolving Legal Needs of Local Food Entrepreneurs (December 18, 2013). 28 A.B.A. Nat. Resources & Env. (2013). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2369358

Emily Broad Leib (Contact Author)

Harvard Law School ( email )

1563 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-390-2590 (Phone)

Amanda L. Kool

Harvard University, Law School - Faculty, Transactional Law Clinics ( email )

Cambridge, MA
United States

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