Food Security in Asia and the Pacific: The Rapidly Changing Role of Rice

Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies (APPS), Forthcoming

18 Pages Posted: 23 Dec 2013 Last revised: 8 Oct 2014

See all articles by C. Peter Timmer

C. Peter Timmer

Harvard University - Department of Economics

Date Written: December 22, 2013

Abstract

Food security in Asia and the Pacific presents a frustrating paradox. At one level, huge progress has been made in the past half century in bringing most of the population out of poverty and hunger. Measured by the key determinants of food security -- improved availability, access, utilization and stability -- food security has never been at higher levels. Large pockets of food-insecure populations remain in the region, especially in South Asia, and continued efforts to reach these households are necessary. At the same time, food security strategies in Asia are mostly in disarray. Most countries are protecting their rice farmers and providing high price supports, but high rice prices hurt the vast majority of the poor. Continued efforts to stabilize rice prices are understandable politically and desirable economically, but much more open trade regimes for rice will help food security throughout the region.

Keywords: food security, role of rice, Asia and the Pacific, price stabilization, behavioural political economy

Suggested Citation

Timmer, C. Peter, Food Security in Asia and the Pacific: The Rapidly Changing Role of Rice (December 22, 2013). Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies (APPS), Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2371125 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2371125

C. Peter Timmer (Contact Author)

Harvard University - Department of Economics

Littauer Center
HIID 504
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-495-9778 (Phone)

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