The Impact of Recent Chemotherapy Innovation on the Longevity of Myeloma Patients: U.S. and International Evidence

32 Pages Posted: 24 Dec 2013

See all articles by Frank R. Lichtenberg

Frank R. Lichtenberg

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

Gisela Hostenkamp

University of Southern Denmark

Date Written: December 23, 2013

Abstract

There were no innovations in chemotherapy for myeloma patients during the period 1977-1997, but there have been several important innovations since 1997. We investigate the impact of recent chemotherapy innovation on the longevity of myeloma patients using both time-series U.S. data and longitudinal data on 26 countries.

In the US, the average annual rate of increase of life expectancy of myeloma patients at time of diagnosis was over five times as large during 1997-2005 as it had been during 1975-1997. We estimate that almost two-thirds (0.99 years) of the 1997-2005 increase in life expectancy was due to the increase in the number of chemotherapy regimens now preferred by specialists, and that the cost per U.S. life-year gained from post-1997 chemotherapy innovation did not exceed $45,551.

We also investigate the impact of chemotherapy innovation on the myeloma mortality rate using longitudinal country-level data on 26 countries during the period 2005-2009. Countries that had larger increases in the number of chemotherapy regimens had larger subsequent declines in myeloma mortality rates, controlling for other factors. The estimates imply that chemotherapy innovation reduced the age-adjusted myeloma cancer mortality rate by about 3.1% during the period 2005-2009.

JEL Classification: I120, L650, O330

Suggested Citation

Lichtenberg, Frank R. and Hostenkamp, Gisela, The Impact of Recent Chemotherapy Innovation on the Longevity of Myeloma Patients: U.S. and International Evidence (December 23, 2013). CESifo Working Paper Series No. 4516. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2371255

Frank R. Lichtenberg (Contact Author)

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics ( email )

3022 Broadway
504 Uris Hall, Dept. of Finance & Economics
New York, NY 10027
United States
212-854-4408 (Phone)
212-316-9219 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/cbs-directory/detail/frl1

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

Gisela Hostenkamp

University of Southern Denmark ( email )

DK-5230 Odense
Denmark

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