The Constitution, Emergency Powers and the Rule of Law in Myanmar

1 Panorama: Myanmar in Transition 45-56

12 Pages Posted: 30 Dec 2013

See all articles by Melissa Crouch

Melissa Crouch

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Date Written: December 29, 2013

Abstract

One of the key challenges as a transitional and democratising state is how the government of Myanmar will deal with social tensions and conflict that arise between religious and ethnic communities. The use of emergency powers is one response, although these powers raise serious questions about the capacity and role of a government to address complex social conflicts. Under the 2008 Constitution, the power to declare a state of emergency is dealt with at some length in Chapter XI. The President has exercised his wide powers to declare a state of emergency twice since the Constitution came into effect in 2011. In this article, I critically examine the use of the constitutional power of emergency. I begin by analysing the response of the executive to the conflict in Rakhine state from June to October 2012, and in Meikhtila District in March 2013. I outline the key elements of emergency powers and identify the challenges to the rule of law inherent in the existing constitutional provisions, including how an emergency is defined, the conditions under which it can be declared, how long it lasts, and what effect it has on human rights.

Suggested Citation

Crouch, Melissa Amy, The Constitution, Emergency Powers and the Rule of Law in Myanmar (December 29, 2013). 1 Panorama: Myanmar in Transition 45-56, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2372839

Melissa Amy Crouch (Contact Author)

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

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