Economic and Health Implications of Long-Term Unemployment: Earnings, Disability Benefits, and Mortality

Posted: 15 Jan 2014

See all articles by Kenneth A. Couch

Kenneth A. Couch

University of Connecticut - Department of Economics

Gayle Reznik

U.S. Social Security Administration

Christopher R. Tamborini

U.S. Social Security Administration

Howard Iams

U.S. Social Security Administration

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

Data from the 1984 Survey of Income and Program Participation are linked to longitudinal records from the Social Security Administration to examine the relationship between the long-term unemployment that prime-aged (ages 25-55) male workers experienced around the time of the 1980-1982 twin recessions with earnings, receipt of either Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income (DI-SSI) benefits, and mortality. Separate estimations are made for those who voluntarily and involuntarily left employment and the combined sample of these two groups. We find that 20 years later, long-term joblessness was associated with significantly lower earnings and higher likelihoods of the receipt of DI-SSI benefits as well as mortality.

Keywords: Earnings, mortality, social security disability insurance

JEL Classification: H55, I31, J31, J63, J65

Suggested Citation

Couch, Kenneth A. and Reznik, Gayle and Tamborini, Christopher R. and Iams, Howard, Economic and Health Implications of Long-Term Unemployment: Earnings, Disability Benefits, and Mortality (2013). Research in Labor Economics, Vol. 38, 2013, pp. 259-305, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2374823

Kenneth A. Couch (Contact Author)

University of Connecticut - Department of Economics ( email )

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Storrs, CT 06269-1063
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860-486-3022 (Phone)
860-486-4463 (Fax)

Gayle Reznik

U.S. Social Security Administration ( email )

Washington, DC 20254
United States

Christopher R. Tamborini

U.S. Social Security Administration ( email )

500 E. Street, S.W.
Washington, DC 20254
United States
202.358.6109 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.ssa.gov/policy/

Howard Iams

U.S. Social Security Administration ( email )

Washington, DC 20254
United States

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