The Red River Jig Around the Convention of 'Indian' Title: The Métis and Half-Breed Dos-À-Dos

Manitoba History 69 (Summer 2012) 17-29

13 Pages Posted: 12 Jan 2014

See all articles by Darren O'Toole

Darren O'Toole

University of Ottawa - Common Law Section

Date Written: 2012

Abstract

While section 31 of the Manitoba Act, 1870 recognized the ‘Indian’ title of the Métis, the leaders of the Resistance of 1869-1870 often tried to avoid phrasing land claims in these terms. To interpret their ambiguous public statements on the subject, the author applies the Cambridge School’s method of textual interpretation of political ideas to their speech acts. When such statements are placed in their practical political context, it becomes apparent that Métis claims to ‘Indian’ title risked alienating the fragile support of the Scots Half-Breeds. The reason for the vehement opposition of the latter is to be found in the binary colonial convention that opposed the rights of ‘savages’ and the rights of the ‘civilized’.

Keywords: Métis; Indian Title; Land Claims

Suggested Citation

O'Toole, Darren, The Red River Jig Around the Convention of 'Indian' Title: The Métis and Half-Breed Dos-À-Dos (2012). Manitoba History 69 (Summer 2012) 17-29. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2378054

Darren O'Toole (Contact Author)

University of Ottawa - Common Law Section ( email )

57 Louis Pasteur Street
Ottawa, K1N 6N5
Canada

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