Affect Monitoring and the Primacy of Feelings in Judgment

22 Pages Posted: 2 Feb 2014

See all articles by Michel Tuan Pham

Michel Tuan Pham

Columbia University - Columbia Business School

Joel Cohen

University of Florida - Warrington College of Business Administration

John Pracejus

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law

David G. Hughes

University of North Carolina School of Law

Date Written: September 1, 2001

Abstract

Multidisciplinary evidence suggests that people often make evaluative judgments by monitoring their feelings toward the target. This article examines, in the context of moderately complex and consciously accessible stimuli, the judgmental properties of consciously monitored feelings. Results from four studies show that, compared to cold, reason-based assessments of the target, the conscious monitoring of feelings provides judgmental responses that are (a) potentially faster, (b) more stable and consistent across individuals, and importantly (c) more predictive of the number and valence of people’s thoughts. These findings help explain why the monitoring of feelings is an often diagnostic pathway to evaluation in judgment and decision making.

Suggested Citation

Pham, Michel Tuan and Cohen, Joel and Pracejus, John and Hughes, David G., Affect Monitoring and the Primacy of Feelings in Judgment (September 1, 2001). Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 28, September 2001, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2388984

Michel Tuan Pham (Contact Author)

Columbia University - Columbia Business School ( email )

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212-854-3472 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://https://www.micheltuanpham.com/

Joel Cohen

University of Florida - Warrington College of Business Administration ( email )

Gainesville, FL 32611
United States

John Pracejus

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law ( email )

Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R6
Canada
780-492-2023 (Phone)
780-492-3325 (Fax)

David G. Hughes

University of North Carolina School of Law ( email )

Van Hecke-Wettach Hall, 160 Ridge Road
CB #3380
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380
United States

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