Transmitting Global Liquidity to East Asia: Policy Rates, Bond Yields, Currencies and Dollar Credit

38 Pages Posted: 27 Feb 2014

See all articles by Dong He

Dong He

Hong Kong Monetary Authority; Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research (HKIMR)

Robert N. McCauley

University of Oxford - Oxford Centre for Global History; Boston University, Global Development Policy Center

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: October 2013

Abstract

We review extant work on the transmission of monetary policy, both conventional and unconventional, of the major advanced economies to East Asia through monetary policy reactions, integrated bond markets and induced currency appreciation. We present new results on the growth of foreign currency credit, especially US dollar credit, as a transmission mechanism. Restrained growth of dollar credit in Korea contrasts with very rapid growth on the Chinese mainland and in Hong Kong SAR.

Keywords: global liquidity, taylor rule, monetary policy, bond markets, exchange rates, foreign currency debt, dollarisation, macroprudential policy, capital controls

JEL Classification: E43, E52, F3, F42, G21, G28

Suggested Citation

He, Dong and McCauley, Robert N. and McCauley, Robert N., Transmitting Global Liquidity to East Asia: Policy Rates, Bond Yields, Currencies and Dollar Credit (October 2013). BIS Working Paper No. 431, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2390172

Dong He (Contact Author)

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

3 Garden Road, 30th Floor
Hong Kong
Hong Kong

Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research (HKIMR)

3 Garden Road, 8th Floor
Hong Kong
China

Robert N. McCauley

University of Oxford - Oxford Centre for Global History ( email )

Mansfield Road
Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 4AU
United Kingdom

Boston University, Global Development Policy Center ( email )

67 Bay State Road
Boston, MA 02215
United States

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