American Time-Styles: A Finite-Mixture Allocation Model for Time-Use Analysis

Multivariate Behavioral Research, October 2009

Posted: 9 Feb 2014

Date Written: 2009

Abstract

Time-use has already been the subject of numerous studies across multiple disciplines such as economics, marketing, sociology, transportation and urban planning.

However, most of this research has focused on comparing demographic groups on a few broadly defined activities (e.g., work for pay, leisure, housework, etc.). In this study we take a holistic perspective, identifying a typology of latent “timestyles,” that defines the different ways people allocate the 24 hr in a day across multiple competing daily activities. We propose a finite-mixture time-allocation model that accounts for differences in life priorities across individuals, taking into consideration the fact that we all have the same “budget” of 24 hr to spend every day and that this allocation leads to highly sparse, truncated data. This model is then applied to time-use data from the American Time Use Survey collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2006.

Suggested Citation

Kamakura, Wagner A., American Time-Styles: A Finite-Mixture Allocation Model for Time-Use Analysis (2009). Multivariate Behavioral Research, October 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2392588

Wagner A. Kamakura (Contact Author)

Rice University ( email )

6100 South Main Street
P.O. Box 1892
Houston, TX 77005-1892
United States
(713) 348-6307 (Phone)

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