Life after Conviction at International Criminal Tribunals -- Empirical Overview

Posted: 13 Feb 2014 Last revised: 17 Aug 2016

See all articles by Barbora Hola

Barbora Hola

VU University Amsterdam - Faculty of Law

Joris Wijk

VU University Amsterdam

Date Written: September 1, 2013

Abstract

As of July 2013 the ICTY, ICTR and SCSL have together convicted and sentenced over 120 perpetrators of international crimes committed during the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone, respectively. Only 13% of the convicts serve life imprisonment. The vast majority has been sentenced to determinate sentences. According to the tribunals’ Statutes convicted persons serve their sentences in a country designated by a tribunal. The enforcement of sentences, including any commutation of sentences, is governed by the laws of the countries of imprisonment. 'International prisoners' have been scattered around Europe and Africa and almost half of the convicts have already been (early) released. It is largely unknown under what conditions international prisoners serve their sentences, what factors justify their (early) release and what they do after their release. In this article we provide a detailed overview of this empirical reality of the post-conviction stage at the international criminal tribunals.

Suggested Citation

Hola, Barbora and Wijk, Joris, Life after Conviction at International Criminal Tribunals -- Empirical Overview (September 1, 2013). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2394202 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2394202

Barbora Hola (Contact Author)

VU University Amsterdam - Faculty of Law ( email )

De Boelelaan 1105
1081 HV Amsterdam
Netherlands

Joris Wijk

VU University Amsterdam ( email )

De Boelelaan 1105
Amsterdam, ND North Holland 1081 HV
Netherlands

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