Housing Tenure Transitions of Older Households: What is the Role of Child Proximity?

44 Pages Posted: 18 Feb 2014

See all articles by Kwan Ok Lee

Kwan Ok Lee

National University of Singapore

Gary Painter

University of Southern California - Sol Price School of Public Policy

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: Spring 2014

Abstract

This study examines the role of proximity of children to their parents and recent moves of children within a proximate distance in housing tenure transitions of older households. This study is the first to investigate the interplay between health status of older households, moves of their children and a household's decision to make housing tenure transitions. In doing so, we rely on longitudinal household data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics with residential location information at the census tract level. The results demonstrate that after controlling for the financial and demographic characteristics of children, living near children reduces the likelihood of making a housing tenure transition for older households, but that the impact of distance is not monotonic with respect to the degree of geographic distances. The results also demonstrate that if a child enters or moves closer to her or his parents’ home, it increases the probability that older households exit homeownership. Finally, we find no evidence that children's moves mitigate the likelihood that their older parents whose health deteriorates become renters.

Suggested Citation

Lee, Kwan Ok and Painter, Gary, Housing Tenure Transitions of Older Households: What is the Role of Child Proximity? (Spring 2014). Real Estate Economics, Vol. 42, Issue 1, pp. 109-152, 2014, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2397512 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/reec.12018

Kwan Ok Lee (Contact Author)

National University of Singapore ( email )

4 Architecture Drive
SDE1-03-03
Singapore, 117566
Singapore
+65 6516 6254 (Phone)
+65 6774 8684 (Fax)

Gary Painter

University of Southern California - Sol Price School of Public Policy ( email )

Los Angeles, CA 90089-0626
United States
213-740-8754 (Phone)
213-740-0001 (Fax)

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