Revolt and Reform in South Asia: Ghadar Movement to 9/11 and After

Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 49, No. 8, pp. 59-73, 2014

15 Pages Posted: 22 Feb 2014

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: February 22, 2014

Abstract

The Ghadar movement holds the clues to unravelling two paradoxes of modern India. First, India remains a constitutional democracy even when authoritarianism is embedded in the architecture of the state. The second paradox is that internationally India is a model for “democratic-development” even though the country has regressed into an abyss of poverty, dispossession, internal strife, ecological precariousness, rising fundamentalisms and militarism since Independence. The Ghadar centenary year is an opportune moment to reflect on the constitutive nature of the rebellion-repression-reform cycles that is formative of the Indian state and Constitution.

Keywords: Ghadar Movement, race and class, internationalism, Indian Constitution contextual analysis, federalism, watan, qwam, anti-terrorism law, legal history, colonial law,

Suggested Citation

D'Souza, Radha, Revolt and Reform in South Asia: Ghadar Movement to 9/11 and After (February 22, 2014). Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 49, No. 8, pp. 59-73, 2014. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2399261

Radha D'Souza (Contact Author)

University of Westminster ( email )

School of Law, University of Westminster
4, Little Titchfield St
London, W1W 7UW
United Kingdom
02079115000 x 2706 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.wmin.ac.uk

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