Houston, We Have a (Liability) Problem

26 Pages Posted: 26 Feb 2014

See all articles by Justin Silver

Justin Silver

University of Michigan Law School

Date Written: February 25, 2014

Abstract

The development of private manned space flight is proceeding rapidly; there are proposals to launch paying passengers before the end of 2014. Given the historically dangerous nature of space travel, an accident will probably occur at some point, resulting in passengers’ injury or death. In the event of a law-suit stemming from such an accident, a court will likely find that a space flight entity operating suborbital flights is a common carrier, while an entity operating orbital flights is not. Regardless of whether these entities are common carriers, they face a threat of high levels of liability, as well as risks stemming from an inability to obtain insurance and the escalation of tort litigation costs. Given that the private manned space flight industry is brand new and can provide many benefits to the United States and the world, it is important to protect the industry while it grows. Individual states have attempted to protect the industry by passing liability immunity statutes, but passing statutes on a state-by-state basis is insufficient to protect the industry from the liability it faces. As a result, this Note proposes a national tort liability immunity statute to shield the industry until it reaches a more advanced stage of development.

Keywords: Space Law, Space, Torts, Regulation, Common Carrier, Liability

JEL Classification: K13, K23

Suggested Citation

Silver, Justin, Houston, We Have a (Liability) Problem (February 25, 2014). Michigan Law Review, Vol. 112, No. 5, 2014. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2401081

Justin Silver (Contact Author)

University of Michigan Law School ( email )

625 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1215
United States

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