Introduction of Book: Dealing with EU Law. The Role of National Courts in the Interpretation and Application of European Union Law

DEALING WITH EU LAW. The role of national courts in the interpretation and application of European Union Law, Mihai Sandru, Giuseppe Martinico, Mihai Banu (eds.), Ed. Universitara, 2014, ISBN 978-606-591-749-1, DOI 10.5682/978606591749, 227 p.

25 Pages Posted: 6 Mar 2014

See all articles by Daniel Mihail Sandru

Daniel Mihail Sandru

Center for European Legal Studies, Legal Research Institute of Romanian Academy

Giuseppe Martinico

Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa

Constantin-Mihai Banu

Center for European Legal Studies, Legal Research Institute of Romanian Academy

Date Written: March 5, 2014

Abstract

This new book aims to provide some insights on recent trends and patters in judicial dialogue between the Court of Justice of the European Union (hereinafter “CJEU”) and national courts (Constitutional Courts included).

The book features seven contributions. Their order is not accidental: specific issues come after more general topics, these latter being dealt with within the first three chapters.

The first article included in this book and written by Giuseppe Martinico serves as a relevant introduction to the subject-matter of this book. It aims at exploring the interesting issue of judicial application of the ECHR and EU law, in order to elucidate the vertical relationship between national judges (constitutional and common law alike) and these external legal sources.

The second contribution is somehow related to the first one: Ioana Răducu discusses the dialogue between courts, and more precisely the way the former accept the decisions rendered by supranational courts and also the role played by the judicial dialogue in reducing the risk of conflicts between courts. Yet the emphasis placed by the author on this judicial dialogue is that of deference. The value of (judicial) dialogue in the EU, as discussed by the author, comes along with pragmatic advantages for both EU and domestic legal orders.

The third chapter, authored by Juan A. Mayoral, approaches the issue of the use of preliminary ruling procedure and tries to establish determinants liable to explain differences in its use between new and old Member States. The value of this contribution lies especially in presenting original and comprehensive data on the use of preliminary references (1961-2011) in all 27 Member States and also in identifying differences in institutional dynamics at the national level.

Giuseppe Bianco and Tatum Ragues present the interesting topic of balance between one fundamental freedom of the European Union (free movement of services) and fundamental rights, as it comes out from the approaches followed by the Court of Justice of the European Union in its rich case law. The authors emphasize the constitutional dimension of the principle of proportionality in the approach taken by the Court of Justice.

Within the same preliminary ruling procedure, Ricardo García Antón approaches in the fifth chapter of this book the role played by the Court of Justice in the field of indirect taxation. Two fundamental questions are explained here: the judicial dialogue between the European court and national courts and the role adopted by the Court of Justice. According to the author, within this field, the Court adopts a more hierarchical role, rather than the traditional cooperative one: “the traditional functions of the CJEU within the preliminary reference system are being replaced by those which belong to a national Supreme Court” (p 116). This paradigm shift is explored at length.

The sixth contribution, written by Mihaela Vrabie, approaches the status of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union in the framework of the preliminary reference procedure, also concerning the much debated issue of the field of application of the Charter with regard to Member States.

The final chapter introduces the parallel application of the Charter of Fundamental Rights and the European Convention on Human Rights by Romanian courts, as pointed out by certain preliminary references to the Court of Justice made by the former, but also in certain decisions by which courts rejected requests of the parties to make references to the Court of Justice. Certain patterns in that regard are approached.

Keywords: Court of Justice of the European Union, Charter of fundamental rights of the European Union, Interpretation and Application of European Union Law

JEL Classification: K22

Suggested Citation

Sandru, Daniel-Mihail and Martinico, Giuseppe and Banu, Constantin-Mihai, Introduction of Book: Dealing with EU Law. The Role of National Courts in the Interpretation and Application of European Union Law (March 5, 2014). DEALING WITH EU LAW. The role of national courts in the interpretation and application of European Union Law, Mihai Sandru, Giuseppe Martinico, Mihai Banu (eds.), Ed. Universitara, 2014, ISBN 978-606-591-749-1, DOI 10.5682/978606591749, 227 p., Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2404902 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2404902

Daniel-Mihail Sandru (Contact Author)

Center for European Legal Studies, Legal Research Institute of Romanian Academy ( email )

Calea 13 Septembrie nr. 13, sector 5
Bucuresti, 050711
Romania
+ 40726999706 (Phone)
+40213188130 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.csde.ro

Giuseppe Martinico

Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa ( email )

Piazza Martiri della libertà
33
Pisa, 56127
Italy
(+39)3494441388 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.stals.santannapisa.it

Constantin-Mihai Banu

Center for European Legal Studies, Legal Research Institute of Romanian Academy ( email )

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