Why Spirituality Belongs in the Business Curriculum

22 Pages Posted: 14 Mar 2014

See all articles by Hershey H. Friedman

Hershey H. Friedman

Brooklyn College of the City University of New York

Linda Weiser Friedman

Baruch College, CUNY - Zicklin School of Business; CUNY - The Graduate Center

Date Written: March 12, 2014

Abstract

The financial crisis of 2008, which followed Enron and other accounting scandals, has made it very clear that much of corporate America has lost its values. We have to rethink what we are teaching students. Since approximately 80% of first-year college students are interested in spirituality, it is quite reasonable to incorporate spiritual values into business courses. Spirituality is not religion so there are few problems with discussing this in a class. Spiritual values include making work meaningful, respect for the creativity of employees, and improving the world. The authors also present case histories of firms that have incorporated spiritual values into the way they conduct business.

Keywords: Spirituality, servant leader, ethics, meaningful work, improving the world.

JEL Classification: A22, A23, D81, G18, G21, I20, L20, L21, M14, M19, M31, Q20, Q38

Suggested Citation

Friedman, Hershey H. and Friedman, Linda Weiser, Why Spirituality Belongs in the Business Curriculum (March 12, 2014). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2408224 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2408224

Hershey H. Friedman (Contact Author)

Brooklyn College of the City University of New York ( email )

Linda Weiser Friedman

Baruch College, CUNY - Zicklin School of Business ( email )

17 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY 10010
United States

HOME PAGE: http://cisnet.baruch.cuny.edu/friedman/

CUNY - The Graduate Center

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New York,, NY 10016
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