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'[A] Man and a Brother': Intersectionality, Violent Hazing, and the Law

98 Pages Posted: 17 Mar 2014  

Gregory Scott Parks

Wake Forest University - School of Law

Shayne E. Jones

University of South Florida

Rashawn Ray

University of Maryland

Matthew W. Hughey

University of Connecticut, Department of Sociology

Jonathan M Cox

University of Central Florida - College of Sciences, Department of Sociology

Date Written: March 15, 2014

Abstract

In this article, my coauthors and I analyze hazing as a legal issue both within the civil and criminal context. We then posit that hazing is not the same across collegiate, Greek-letter organizations. Specifically, we contend that the intersection of race and gender should reveal differences in how hazing manifests itself. In an archival study of fraternity/sorority hazing incidents from 1980-2009, we find that white fraternities/sororities have greater issues with sexual hazing, alcohol-related hazing, prank hazing. White fraternities have greater issues with mental hazing and physical hazing involving calisthenics. Black fraternities/sororities have greater issues with violent hazing. In a second study, a survey of almost 1,400 black fraternity/sorority members, we find that hazing is more violent in black fraternities. Narrow conceptions of what constitutes “authentic” black masculinity, even among highly educated African Americans, may explain why black fraternity hazing is so violent. In two more studies, we find that some black fraternity chapters employ monikers — e.g., Bloody Beta, Deadly Delta, Killer Kappa — to describe their chapters. Such monikers may be consequential in litigation, as they may be admissible under the Federal Rules of Evidence, at least in federal court, under certain circumstances.

Suggested Citation

Parks, Gregory Scott and Jones, Shayne E. and Ray, Rashawn and Hughey, Matthew W. and Cox, Jonathan M, '[A] Man and a Brother': Intersectionality, Violent Hazing, and the Law (March 15, 2014). Wake Forest Univ. Legal Studies Paper No. 2409764. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2409764 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2409764

Gregory Scott Parks (Contact Author)

Wake Forest University - School of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 7206
Winston-Salem, NC 27109
United States
3367582170 (Phone)

Shayne E. Jones

University of South Florida

Tampa, FL 33620
United States

Rashawn Ray

University of Maryland ( email )

College Park
College Park, MD 20742
United States

Matthew W. Hughey

University of Connecticut, Department of Sociology ( email )

Unit 2068
344 Mansfield Road
Storrs, CT 06269-2-68
United States
860.486.4422 (Phone)
860.486.6356 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.matthewhughey.com

Jonathan M Cox

University of Central Florida - College of Sciences, Department of Sociology ( email )

FL 32816-1400
United States

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