Explaining Gender Differentials in Agricultural Production in Nigeria

59 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016 Last revised: 2 Jun 2020

See all articles by Gbemisola Oseni

Gbemisola Oseni

World Bank

Paul Corral

American University - Department of Economics

Markus Goldstein

World Bank

Paul Winters

American University; American University - Center for Latin American & Latino Studies (CLALS)

Paul Andres Corral Rodas

World Bank

Gbemisola Oseni Siwatu

World Bank

Paul Conal Winters

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: March 1, 2014

Abstract

This paper uses data from the General Household Survey Panel 2010/11 to analyze differences in agricultural productivity across male and female plot managers in Nigeria. The analysis utilizes the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition method, which allows for decomposing the unconditional gender gap into (i) the portion caused by observable differences in the factors of production (endowment effect) and (ii) the unexplained portion caused by differences in returns to the same observed factors of production (structural effect). The analysis is conducted separately for the North and South regions, excluding the west of the country. The findings show that in the North, women produce 28 percent less than men after controlling for observed factors of production, while there are no significant gender differences in the South. In the decomposition results, the structural effect in the North is larger than the endowment at the mean. Although women in the North have access to less productive resources than men, the results indicate that even if given the same level of inputs, significant differences still emerge. However for the South, the decomposition results show that the endowment effect is more important than the structural effect. Access to resources explains most of the gender gap in the South and if women are given the same level of inputs as men, the gap will be minimal. The difference in the results for the North and South suggests that policy should vary by region.

Keywords: Gender and Development, Food Security, Inequality, Climate Change and Agriculture, Crops and Crop Management Systems, Gender and Economic Policy, Gender and Poverty, Gender and Economics, Economics and Gender

Suggested Citation

Oseni, Gbemisola and Corral, Paul and Goldstein, Markus P. and Winters, Paul and Corral Rodas, Paul Andres and Siwatu, Gbemisola Oseni and Winters, Paul Conal, Explaining Gender Differentials in Agricultural Production in Nigeria (March 1, 2014). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 6809. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2411809

Gbemisola Oseni (Contact Author)

World Bank ( email )

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Paul Corral

American University - Department of Economics

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Markus P. Goldstein

World Bank ( email )

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Paul Winters

American University ( email )

4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20016
United States

American University - Center for Latin American & Latino Studies (CLALS) ( email )

4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20016
United States

Paul Andres Corral Rodas

World Bank

1818 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Gbemisola Oseni Siwatu

World Bank

1818 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Paul Conal Winters

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

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