Noncommunicable Diseases and Human Rights: A Promising Synergy

American Journal of Public Health, March 2014, DOI: 10.2105/ AJPH.2013.301849

4 Pages Posted: 22 Mar 2014 Last revised: 26 Apr 2014

See all articles by Sofia Gruskin

Sofia Gruskin

University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine; University of Southern California Gould School of Law; Harvard School of Public Health

Laura Ferguson

Harvard School of Public Health

Daniel Tarantola

University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Robert Beaglehole

University of Auckland

Date Written: April 25, 2014

Abstract

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have finally emerged onto the global health and development agenda. Despite the increasingly important role human rights play in other areas of global health, their contribution to NCD prevention and control remains nascent.

The recently adopted Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013-2020 is an important step forward, but the lack of concrete attention to human rights is a missed opportunity.

With practical implications for policy development, priority setting, and strategic design, human rights offer a logical, robust set of norms and standards; define the legal obligations of governments; and provide accountability mechanisms that can be used to enhance current approaches to NCD prevention and control. Harnessing the power of human rights can strengthen action for NCDs at the local, national, and global levels.

Suggested Citation

Gruskin, Sofia and Ferguson, Laura and Tarantola, Daniel and Beaglehole, Robert, Noncommunicable Diseases and Human Rights: A Promising Synergy (April 25, 2014). American Journal of Public Health, March 2014, DOI: 10.2105/ AJPH.2013.301849, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2412185

Sofia Gruskin (Contact Author)

University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine ( email )

2001 N. Soto Street
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

HOME PAGE: http://globalhealth.usc.edu/ghhr

University of Southern California Gould School of Law ( email )

699 Exposition Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

Harvard School of Public Health ( email )

677 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA MA 02115
United States

Laura Ferguson

Harvard School of Public Health ( email )

677 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA MA 02115
United States

Daniel Tarantola

University of New South Wales (UNSW) ( email )

Kensington
High St
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

Robert Beaglehole

University of Auckland ( email )

Private Bag 92019
Auckland Mail Centre
Auckland, 1142
New Zealand

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