Proposing the Affect-Trust Infusion Model (ATIM) to Explain and Predict the Influence of High- and Low-Affect Infusion on Web-Vendor Trust

Information & Management, vol. 51(5), pp. 579–594

66 Pages Posted: 26 Mar 2014 Last revised: 19 Jun 2014

See all articles by Paul Benjamin Lowry

Paul Benjamin Lowry

Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University - Pamplin College of Business

Nathan Twyman

University of Arizona - Department of Management Information Systems

Matthew Pickard

Georgia State University

Jeffrey L. Jenkins

University of Arizona

Son Ngoc Bui

Brigham Young University - Department of Information Systems

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: April 28, 2014

Abstract

Trust is just as essential to online business as it is to offline transactions but can be more difficult to achieve — especially for newer Web sites associated with unknown Web vendors. Research explains that Web vendor trust can be created by cognitive and affective influences. But under what circumstances will emotion more powerfully impact trust and when will cognition be more powerful? Theory-based answers to these questions can help online Web vendors design better Web sites that account for unleveraged factors that will increase trust in the Web vendor.

We adapt the Affect Infusion Model to propose the Affect-Trust Infusion Model (ATIM) that explains and predicts how and when cognition, through perceived Web site performance (PWP), and positive emotion (PE) each influence Web vendor trust. ATIM explains the underlying causal mechanisms that determine the degree of affect infusion and the subsequent processing strategy that a user adopts when interacting with a new Web site. Under high-affect infusion, PE acts as a mediator between PWP and vendor trust; under low-affect infusion, PWP primarily impacts trust and PE is disintermediated. We review two distinct, rigorously validated experiments that empirically support ATIM. To conclude, we detail several promising research opportunities that can leverage ATIM and show how it can help to guide user-centered design (UCD) as example practical application.

Keywords: Website design, trust, emotion, affect, affect infusion, Web site performance, Affect-Trust Infusion Model (ATIM)

Suggested Citation

Lowry, Paul Benjamin and Twyman, Nathan and Pickard, Matthew and Jenkins, Jeffrey L. and Bui, Son Ngoc, Proposing the Affect-Trust Infusion Model (ATIM) to Explain and Predict the Influence of High- and Low-Affect Infusion on Web-Vendor Trust (April 28, 2014). Information & Management, vol. 51(5), pp. 579–594, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2414428

Paul Benjamin Lowry (Contact Author)

Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University - Pamplin College of Business ( email )

1016 Pamplin Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061
United States

Nathan Twyman

University of Arizona - Department of Management Information Systems ( email )

AZ
United States

Matthew Pickard

Georgia State University ( email )

35 Broad Street
Atlanta, GA 30303-3083
United States

Jeffrey L. Jenkins

University of Arizona ( email )

Department of History
Tucson, AZ 85721
United States

Son Ngoc Bui

Brigham Young University - Department of Information Systems ( email )

510 Tanner Building
Marriott School
Provo, UT 84602
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
13
Abstract Views
442
PlumX Metrics