The Social Construction of the Great Depression: Industrial Policy During the 1930s in the United States, Britain, and France

Theory and Society, Volume 22, Issue 1 (February 1993), 1-56

57 Pages Posted: 30 Mar 2014

See all articles by Frank Dobbin

Frank Dobbin

Harvard University - Department of Sociology

Date Written: 1993

Abstract

The Great Depression called Western nations' most fundamental ideas about economic growth into question by disrupting the march of progress. Governments responded by rejecting orthodox growth strategies in favor of new policies they hoped would turn their economies around.' In the realm of macro-economic policy, governments had followed a common orthodoxy before the 1930s that prescribed adhering to the gold standard and cutting spending in hard times; yet during the depression they adopted a new orthodoxy that prescribed exactly the opposite: currency devaluation and increased public spending.

Suggested Citation

Dobbin, Frank, The Social Construction of the Great Depression: Industrial Policy During the 1930s in the United States, Britain, and France (1993). Theory and Society, Volume 22, Issue 1 (February 1993), 1-56. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2417459

Frank Dobbin (Contact Author)

Harvard University - Department of Sociology ( email )

33 Kirkland Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
23
Abstract Views
355
PlumX Metrics