Procedural Predictability and the Employer as Litigator: The Supreme Court's 2012-2013 Term

52 U. Louisville Law Review 497 (2014 Forthcoming)

32 Pages Posted: 8 Apr 2014

See all articles by Scott R. Bauries

Scott R. Bauries

University of Kentucky J. David Rosenberg College of Law

Date Written: April 7, 2014

Abstract

In this contribution to the University of Louisville Law Review’s Annual Carl A. Warns Labor and Employment Institute issue, I examine the Supreme Court’s labor and employment-related decisions from the October Term 2012 (OT 2012). I argue that the Court’s decisions assisted employers as litigators — as repeat players in the employment dispute resolution system — in two ways. First, the Court established simple contract drafting strategies that employers may use to limit their exposure to employment claims. Second, the Court adopted bright-line interpretations of employment statutes. Both forms of assistance served a formalist interest in what I term “procedural predictability” — enhanced employer predictability and control of both the duration and costs of resolving employment disputes.

Keywords: Supreme Court, employment law, employment discrimination, judicial decision making, legal formalism

JEL Classification: K31

Suggested Citation

Bauries, Scott R., Procedural Predictability and the Employer as Litigator: The Supreme Court's 2012-2013 Term (April 7, 2014). 52 U. Louisville Law Review 497 (2014 Forthcoming), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2421467

Scott R. Bauries (Contact Author)

University of Kentucky J. David Rosenberg College of Law ( email )

620 S. Limestone Street
Lexington, KY 40506-0048
United States

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