The Causes of Regional Variations in U.S. Poverty: A Cross-County Analysis

Journal of Regional Science, Vol. 40, Issue 3, August 2000

Posted: 17 Aug 2001

See all articles by William Levernier

William Levernier

Georgia Southern University

Mark Partridge

Ohio State University (OSU) - Department of Agricultural, Environmental & Development Economics

Dan S. Rickman

Oklahoma State University - Stillwater - Department of Economics & Legal Studies in Business

Abstract

The persistence of poverty in the modern American economy, with rates of poverty in some areas approaching those of less advanced economies, remains a central concern among policy makers. Therefore, in this study we use U.S. county-level data to explore potential explanations for the observed regional variation in the rates of poverty. The use of counties allows examination of both non-metropolitan area and metropolitan area poverty. Factors considered include those that relate to both area economic performance and area demographic composition. Specific county economic factors examined include economic growth, industry restructuring, and labor market skills mismatches.

Suggested Citation

Levernier, William B. and Partridge, Mark D. and Rickman, Dan S., The Causes of Regional Variations in U.S. Poverty: A Cross-County Analysis. Journal of Regional Science, Vol. 40, Issue 3, August 2000. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=242197

William B. Levernier (Contact Author)

Georgia Southern University ( email )

P.O. Box 8151
Statesboro, GA 30460-8151
United States
(912) 681-5161 (Phone)

Mark D. Partridge

Ohio State University (OSU) - Department of Agricultural, Environmental & Development Economics ( email )

2120 Fyffe Rd
Columbus, OH 43210-1067
United States

Dan S. Rickman

Oklahoma State University - Stillwater - Department of Economics & Legal Studies in Business ( email )

201 Business Building
Stillwater, OK 74078-0555
United States

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