How Males and Females Differ in Their Likelihood of Transmitting Negative Word of Mouth

Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 40, April 2014

13 Pages Posted: 18 Apr 2014

See all articles by Yinlong Zhang

Yinlong Zhang

University of Texas at San Antonio

Lawrence Feick

University of Pittsburgh

Vikas Mittal

Rice University

Date Written: 2014

Abstract

This article shows that the joint effect of tie strength and image-impairment concern on negative word-of-mouth (NWOM) transmission is different for males and females and argues that this effect occurs because of differences in their relative concern for self versus others. For males, there was not a significant interaction between image-impairment concern and tie strength on NWOM transmission likelihood. In contrast, for females the effect of image-impairment concern on NWOM transmission likelihood was stronger for weak ties than for strong ties. The robustness of the findings were tested in two additional studies by directly manipulating relative concern for self versus others and by employing an indirect proxy: interdependent and independent self-construal. Self-versus other-focused thoughts mediated the joint effect on NWOM transmission.

Suggested Citation

Zhang, Yinlong and Feick, Lawrence and Mittal, Vikas, How Males and Females Differ in Their Likelihood of Transmitting Negative Word of Mouth (2014). Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 40, April 2014. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2425685

Yinlong Zhang (Contact Author)

University of Texas at San Antonio ( email )

One UTSA Circle
San Antonio, TX 78249
United States

Lawrence Feick

University of Pittsburgh ( email )

135 N Bellefield Ave
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
United States

Vikas Mittal

Rice University ( email )

6100 South Main Street
250 McNair
Houston, TX 77005-1892
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
407
Abstract Views
2,021
rank
73,258
PlumX Metrics