The Musicology of Justice: Simon Bikindi and Incitement to Genocide at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

Soundtrack of Conflict: The Role of Music in Radio Broadcasting in Wartime & in Conflict Situations, 2013

19 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2014

See all articles by James Parker

James Parker

University of Melbourne (Law)

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

Between 2006 and 2008, Simon Bikindi stood trial at the ICTR accused of inciting genocide with his songs. What musicological factors were decisive at trial? How did the ICTR 'think' about music for the purposes of judgment in the Bikindi case? These are the questions which this book chapter addresses. It argues that for the most part the Tribunal avoided dealing explicitly with Bikindi's music altogether. Music's significance was treated as being being self-evident and strictly irrelevant in juridical terms. Legally, music did not seem to matter at all. Ultimately, the chapter argues that this juridical deafness must be read as a failure on the part of the international community in its collective responsibility to hold Bikindi properly to account.

Keywords: Simon Bikindi, Incitement to Genocide, Rwanda, Musicology, Justice, International Criminal Law

Suggested Citation

Parker, James E K, The Musicology of Justice: Simon Bikindi and Incitement to Genocide at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (2013). Soundtrack of Conflict: The Role of Music in Radio Broadcasting in Wartime & in Conflict Situations, 2013, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2426392

James E K Parker (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne (Law) ( email )

185 Pelham Street
Carlton, Victoria 3053
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.unimelb.edu.au/index.cfm?objectid=2E538FF0-ED5B-11E0-95850050568D0140&Profile=340808

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