Poverty, Inequality, and Theories of Forcible Rape

Crime and Delinquency, 31: 293 305

12 Pages Posted: 21 Apr 2014

See all articles by M Smith

M Smith

University of South Florida - Department of Criminology

Nathan Bennett

Georgia Institute of Technology - Organizational Behavior Area; J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Date Written: April 1, 1985

Abstract

This study provides an empirical assessment of theories of rape that suggest that conditions of poverty and inequality account for differences in rates of rape among communities in the United States. To compensate for problems of statistical unreliability, 1980 data for 88 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) with extremely high or low rates of rape are analyzed. Poverty, but not racial economic inequality, is found to partially account for differences in these communities. However, other demographic factors, most notably the percentage of the community divorced or separated, are found to be even more viable predictors of high rape rates.

Suggested Citation

Smith, M and Bennett, Nathan, Poverty, Inequality, and Theories of Forcible Rape (April 1, 1985). Crime and Delinquency, 31: 293 305, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2426891

M Smith

University of South Florida - Department of Criminology ( email )

4202 East Fowler Ave, SOC107
Tampa, FL 33620-7200
United States

Nathan Bennett (Contact Author)

Georgia Institute of Technology - Organizational Behavior Area ( email )

800 West Peachtree St.
Atlanta, GA 30308
United States

J. Mack Robinson College of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 4050
Atlanta, GA 30303-3083
United States

HOME PAGE: http://nate-bennett.com

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