New Scanner Data for Brand Marketers: How Neuroscience Can Help Better Understand Differences in Brand Preferences

Journal of Consumer Psychology 22 (2012) 143–153

11 Pages Posted: 30 Apr 2014 Last revised: 31 Dec 2016

See all articles by Vinod Venkatraman

Vinod Venkatraman

Temple University - Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management

John A. Clithero

Lundquist College of Business, University of Oregon

Gavan J. Fitzsimons

Duke University - Fuqua School of Business

Scott Huettel

Duke University - Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Date Written: November 17, 2011

Abstract

A core goal for marketers is effective segmentation: partitioning a brand's or product's consumer base into distinct and meaningful groups with differing needs. Traditional segmentation data include factors like geographic location, demographics, and shopping history. Yet, research into the cognitive and affective processes underlying consumption decisions shows that these variables can improve the matching of consumers with products beyond traditional demographic and benefit approaches. We propose, using managing a brand as an example, that neuroscience provides a novel way to establish mappings between cognitive processes and traditional marketing data. An improved understanding of the neural mechanisms of decision making will enhance the ability of marketers to effectively market their products. Just as neuroscience can model potential influences on the decision process — including pricing, choice strategy, context, experience, and memory — it can also provide new insights into individual differences in consumption behavior and brand preferences. We outline such a research agenda for incorporating neuroscience data into future attempts to match consumers to brands.

Keywords: Brands, Choice, fMRI, Marketing, Neuromarketing, Neuroscience

Suggested Citation

Venkatraman, Vinod and Clithero, John A. and Fitzsimons, Gavan J. and Huettel, Scott, New Scanner Data for Brand Marketers: How Neuroscience Can Help Better Understand Differences in Brand Preferences (November 17, 2011). Journal of Consumer Psychology 22 (2012) 143–153, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2430740

Vinod Venkatraman (Contact Author)

Temple University - Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management ( email )

Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States

John A. Clithero

Lundquist College of Business, University of Oregon ( email )

Lundquist College of Business
1208 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
United States

Gavan J. Fitzsimons

Duke University - Fuqua School of Business ( email )

Box 90120
Durham, NC 27708-0120
United States

Scott Huettel

Duke University - Department of Psychology and Neuroscience ( email )

Durham, NC 27708
United States

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