Sleep Deprivation Biases the Neural Mechanisms Underlying Economic Preferences

The Journal of Neuroscience, March 9, 2011, 31(10):3712-3718

7 Pages Posted: 2 May 2014 Last revised: 31 Dec 2016

See all articles by Vinod Venkatraman

Vinod Venkatraman

Temple University - Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management

Scott Huettel

Duke University - Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Lisa Chuah

Singapore Health Services Pte Ltd

John W. Payne

Duke University - Marketing

Michael Chee

Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore

Date Written: August 22, 2010

Abstract

A single night of sleep deprivation (SD) evoked a strategy shift during risky decision making such that healthy human volunteers moved from defending against losses to seeking increased gains. This change in economic preferences was correlated with the magnitude of an SD-driven increase in ventromedial prefrontal activation as well as by an SD-driven decrease in anterior insula activation during decision making. Analogous changes were observed during receipt of reward outcomes: elevated activation to gains in ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum, but attenuated anterior insula activation following losses. Finally, the observed shift in economic preferences was not correlated with change in psychomotor vigilance. These results suggest that a night of total sleep deprivation affects the neural mechanisms underlying economic preferences independent of its effects on vigilant attention.

Suggested Citation

Venkatraman, Vinod and Huettel, Scott and Chuah, Lisa and Payne, John W. and Chee, Michael, Sleep Deprivation Biases the Neural Mechanisms Underlying Economic Preferences (August 22, 2010). The Journal of Neuroscience, March 9, 2011, 31(10):3712-3718, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2430746

Vinod Venkatraman (Contact Author)

Temple University - Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management ( email )

Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States

Scott Huettel

Duke University - Department of Psychology and Neuroscience ( email )

Durham, NC 27708
United States

Lisa Chuah

Singapore Health Services Pte Ltd ( email )

7 Hospital Drive
Block A, Room #02-01
Singapore, 597627
Singapore

John W. Payne

Duke University - Marketing ( email )

United States

Michael Chee

Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore ( email )

Singapore
Singapore

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