When Enough Isn't Enough: Qualitative and Quantitative Assessments of Adequate Education in State Constitutions by State Supreme Courts

University of Toledo Law Review, 41 U. Tol. L. Rev. 545 (Spring 2010)

42 Pages Posted: 7 May 2014

See all articles by Amy Moore

Amy Moore

Belmont University - College of Law

Date Written: Spring 2010

Abstract

This article facilitates the education debate by directing the question of what having an adequate education means, and how state supreme courts are grappling with the issue. This article uses a study of case law from state supreme courts analyzing state constitutional requirements for education. Three themes emerge from this study of case law: state supreme courts are dealing with a choice between judicial restraint and interference; courts struggle with how much to consider funding as opposed to other issues; and courts are trying to define adequacy claims within the context of equity claims.

Keywords: education, state constitution, state supreme courts, adequacy

Suggested Citation

Moore, Amy, When Enough Isn't Enough: Qualitative and Quantitative Assessments of Adequate Education in State Constitutions by State Supreme Courts (Spring 2010). University of Toledo Law Review, 41 U. Tol. L. Rev. 545 (Spring 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2433082

Amy Moore (Contact Author)

Belmont University - College of Law ( email )

1900 Belmont Boulevard
Nashville, TN 37212
United States

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