Employment Verification Mandates and the Labor Market Outcomes of Likely Unauthorized and Native Workers

10 Pages Posted: 9 May 2014

See all articles by Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes

Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes

San Diego State University - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Cynthia Bansak

Saint Lawrence University - Department of Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: July 2014

Abstract

As recent efforts to reform immigration policy at the federal level have failed, states have started to take immigration matters into their own hands and researchers have been paying closer attention to state dynamics surrounding immigration policy. Yet, to this date, there is not a clear understanding of the consequences of enforcing E‐Verify on likely unauthorized immigrants or on natives across the United States. This study aims to fill in that gap by analyzing the impact that the enactment of various types of E‐Verify mandates may have on the employment and wages of these groups. We find that the enactment of employment verification mandates reduces the employment likelihood of likely unauthorized workers. Additionally, it raises the hourly wages of likely unauthorized women. None of these impacts are observed among a similarly skilled sample of naturalized Hispanic immigrants. Finally, the enactment of E‐Verify mandates appears to raise the employment likelihood of alike non‐Hispanic natives, while raising the hourly wage of native‐born male employees, alluding to the potential substitutability of unauthorized immigrants and non‐Hispanic natives.

JEL Classification: J2, J3, J6

Suggested Citation

Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina and Bansak, Cynthia, Employment Verification Mandates and the Labor Market Outcomes of Likely Unauthorized and Native Workers (July 2014). Contemporary Economic Policy, Vol. 32, Issue 3, pp. 671-680, 2014. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2434880 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/coep.12043

Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes (Contact Author)

San Diego State University - Department of Economics ( email )

5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego, CA 92182
United States
619-594-1663 (Phone)
619-594-5062 (Fax)

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Cynthia Bansak

Saint Lawrence University - Department of Economics ( email )

One Romoda Drive
Canton, NY 13617
United States

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