Putting the Cartel before the House? Public Funding of Parties in Queensland

13 Pages Posted: 22 May 2014 Last revised: 3 Oct 2014

See all articles by Graeme D. Orr

Graeme D. Orr

The University of Queensland - T.C. Beirne School of Law

Date Written: 2014

Abstract

Political funding laws as the state level have been a source of innovation in recent years. This paper examines the curious case of Queensland, which has veered from mimicking the Commonwealth's light touch regulation, to highly regulated, and back to light regulation, in barely one electoral cycle (2011-14). In each of the two instances of reform, first ALP then LNP governments have driven through generous and duopolistic party funding laws. This paper will explore the legislative gist, history and context of these developments, and in particular the limited consultation and review involved in these reforms given Queensland's unicameral system. It will also briefly compare and contrast the Queensland approach to contemporaneous reform in New South Wales (with largely monopartisan outcomes) and in South Australia (which achieved multipartisan agreement).

Suggested Citation

Orr, Graeme, Putting the Cartel before the House? Public Funding of Parties in Queensland (2014). The Australian Political Studies Association Annual Conference, University of Sydney Paper​, University of Queensland TC Beirne School of Law Research Paper No. 14-24, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2440255 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2440255

Graeme Orr (Contact Author)

The University of Queensland - T.C. Beirne School of Law ( email )

The University of Queensland
St Lucia
4072 Brisbane, Queensland 4072
Australia

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