Egypt's Public Protest Law 2013: A Boost to Freedom or a Further Restriction?

11 US-China L. Rev., (2014) Forthcoming

13 Pages Posted: 9 Jun 2014

See all articles by Mohamed Abdelaal

Mohamed Abdelaal

Alexandria University - Faculty of Law; Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Date Written: June 7, 2014

Abstract

On November 24, 2013, Egypt’s interim president Adly Mansour signed into law the Public Protest Law after it was proposed by the interim government, and soon it became the main concern in Egypt due to claims that after the ousting of President Mohamed Morsi, of the Muslim Brotherhood, the country is currently ruled by a military-backed government that seeks to restrict freedom and rights in order to introduce a new authoritarian-military rule. The government promoted the law by arguing that it aims to maintain stability and security in Egypt’s streets and that it only targets factional protest movements and saboteurs. Nevertheless, the law has been widely criticized by human rights groups as well as rights and political activists who say it restricts freedom of speech and that it is an attempt to completely ban the right to protest, not to regulate it as the government claims.

Keywords: Protest Law, The 2013 Constitution, Constitutionality, Human Rights, Constitutional Freedoms

Suggested Citation

Abdelaal, Mohamed, Egypt's Public Protest Law 2013: A Boost to Freedom or a Further Restriction? (June 7, 2014). 11 US-China L. Rev., (2014) Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2440939

Mohamed Abdelaal (Contact Author)

Alexandria University - Faculty of Law ( email )

Moustafa Mshrafa st.
Souter
Alexandria
Egypt

Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law ( email )

530 West New York Street, Lawrence W. Inlow Hall
Indianapolis, IN Indiana 46202
United States

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