Regulating Toxics: Sex and Gender in Canada's Chemicals Management Plan

Dayna Nadine Scott & Sarah Lewis, Sex and Gender in Canada's Chemicals Management Plan, in Dayna Nadine Scott (ed.) Our Chemical Selves: Toxics, Gender and Environmental Health, UBC Press, 2014 Forthcoming

Osgoode Hall Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 29/2014

33 Pages Posted: 7 Jun 2014 Last revised: 24 Jul 2014

See all articles by Sarah Lewis

Sarah Lewis

Independent

Dayna Nadine Scott

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School

Date Written: June 5, 2014

Abstract

Chemical substances are found everywhere in our environment. Whether it be at home, outdoors, or in the workplace, we are continuously coming into contact with various chemicals through our air, water, food, cosmetics, clothes, personal care products and everyday household items (Cooper, Vanderlinden, and Ursitti 2011; Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment 2008). As our detection methods improve, we are increasingly forced to confront the evidence of these exposures: biomonitoring studies now show that nearly everyone has measurable amounts of almost all known toxic chemicals stored somewhere in their bodies (CDC 2013; Environmental Defence 2009; Statistics Canada 2012).

At the same time, we are witnessing a rise in incidence of a number of diseases and disorders in men and women. These include mutagenic illnesses, irreversible developmental and neurodevelopmental syndromes, reproductive disorders, and a number of autoimmune diseases. Many scientists, environmental groups and health practitioners suggest that the rising incidence of many of these disorders and diseases can be tied to chemical exposures in our environment (Cooper, Vanderlinden, and Ursitti 2011).

Keywords: Chemical substances, Health, Environment

JEL Classification: K10, K32

Suggested Citation

Lewis, Sarah and Scott, Dayna Nadine, Regulating Toxics: Sex and Gender in Canada's Chemicals Management Plan (June 5, 2014). Dayna Nadine Scott & Sarah Lewis, Sex and Gender in Canada's Chemicals Management Plan, in Dayna Nadine Scott (ed.) Our Chemical Selves: Toxics, Gender and Environmental Health, UBC Press, 2014 Forthcoming, Osgoode Hall Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 29/2014, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2441322

Sarah Lewis

Independent ( email )

Dayna Nadine Scott (Contact Author)

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School ( email )

4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3
Canada

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