Paradigm Shifts and Practical Benefits to Persons with Print Disabilities: Reforms to Anti-Discrimination and Copyright Laws

University of New South Wales Law Journal, Vol. 3, No. p. 36, 2013

Paul Harpur, ‘Is the Regulation of Technologies Enabling or Disabling? Realizing the Potential for EBooks to Transform the Lives of Persons with Print Disabilities’ (University of Queensland New Staff Research Start-up project 2013).

Round Table on Information Access for People with Print Disabilities Inc., Saturday 17th May to Tuesday 20th May 2014, Brisbane

Posted: 26 May 2014

See all articles by Paul Harpur

Paul Harpur

University of Queensland - T.C. Beirne School of Law

Nicolas Suzor

Queensland University of Technology - Faculty of Law

Date Written: May 17, 2014

Abstract

There are over 129 million book titles in the world, but persons with print disabilities can obtain less than 7% of these titles in formats that they can read. In the 19th century this situation might be defendable. In the 21st century, with massive creation of EBook libraries and the advancement of technologies, this presentation argues that persons with print disabilities should be accessing the written word on the same basis of the wider community. This presentation will start by explaining the existence of the book famine and how technology enables persons with disabilities to gain access to the written word. This presentation argues that it is no longer technology or cost that prevents access, but political will. this presentation will explore the legal rights and developments impacting upon access. The international community is recognising how changes in technology create greater potential for access. Indeed, the authors argues that a new international paradigm is emerging that supports access. The authors will introduce and explain the operation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (‘CRPD’) and the new Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons who are Blind, Visually Impaired, or otherwise Print Disabled. The adoption of these treaties has introduced a new accessibility paradigm to challenge the limited access model.

Keywords: Print disability, copyright, Disability Laws

Suggested Citation

Harpur, Paul David and Suzor, Nicolas, Paradigm Shifts and Practical Benefits to Persons with Print Disabilities: Reforms to Anti-Discrimination and Copyright Laws (May 17, 2014). University of New South Wales Law Journal, Vol. 3, No. p. 36, 2013; Paul Harpur, ‘Is the Regulation of Technologies Enabling or Disabling? Realizing the Potential for EBooks to Transform the Lives of Persons with Print Disabilities’ (University of Queensland New Staff Research Start-up project 2013).; Round Table on Information Access for People with Print Disabilities Inc., Saturday 17th May to Tuesday 20th May 2014, Brisbane. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2441617

Paul David Harpur (Contact Author)

University of Queensland - T.C. Beirne School of Law ( email )

Brisbane, Queensland 4072
Australia

Nicolas Suzor

Queensland University of Technology - Faculty of Law ( email )

GPO Box 2434
Brisbane, Queensland 4001
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://nic.suzor.net/

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