Do No Child Left Behind Sanction Unfairly Target Poor, Minority Schools?

21 Pages Posted: 25 Aug 2014

Date Written: 2014

Abstract

Since A Nation at Risk report was released in 1983, improving the quality of the educational system in the United States has been an issue of high national importance. To address the perceived failure of the American educational system, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) implemented a combination of high-stakes testing and sanctions for low-performing schools. Twelve years after the passage of NCLB, serious disagreement still exists as to the efficacy and appropriateness of NCLB’s sanctions. In this paper, we examine recent data on California schools and find that a) that NCLB sanctions were more likely to be imposed on disproportionately poor, minority schools, yet b) schools facing NCLB sanctions improved more rapidly on standardized tests than did schools that did not face sanctions.

Keywords: No Child Left Behind, NCLB, Education, Education Policy

Suggested Citation

Thorson, Gregory R, Do No Child Left Behind Sanction Unfairly Target Poor, Minority Schools? (2014). APSA 2014 Annual Meeting Paper, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2453453

Gregory R Thorson (Contact Author)

University of Redlands ( email )

1200 E Colton Ave
Redlands, CA 92373-0999
United States
909-748-8636 (Phone)

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