Are Suburban Firms More Likely to Discriminate Against African-Americans?

Journal of Urban Economics, Vol. 48, No. 3, November 2000

Posted: 10 Jul 2001

See all articles by Steven Raphael

Steven Raphael

University of California, Berkeley - The Richard & Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy

Michael A. Stoll

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Public Policy & Social Research

Harry J. Holzer

Georgetown University - Public Policy Institute (GPPI); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Abstract

This paper assesses whether African-Americans are more likely to experience employment discrimination in the suburbs relative to the central city. We compare central city-suburban differences in racial hiring outcomes for firms where whites are in charge of hiring to the comparable difference for firms where blacks are in charge of hiring. Both suburban black and white employers hire fewer blacks than their central-city counterparts. This geographic gap among black employers is at least as large as that of white employers. Assuming no discrimination by black employers in any location, this implies that the probability of experiencing discrimination does not vary over space. Black firms, however, are substantially more likely to hire black workers regardless of location.

Suggested Citation

Raphael, Steven and Stoll, Michael and Holzer, Harry J., Are Suburban Firms More Likely to Discriminate Against African-Americans?. Journal of Urban Economics, Vol. 48, No. 3, November 2000. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=246761

Steven Raphael (Contact Author)

University of California, Berkeley - The Richard & Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy ( email )

2607 Hearst Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94720-7320

Michael Stoll

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Public Policy & Social Research ( email )

3250 Public Policy Bldg Box 951656
Los Angeles, CA 90095
United States
310-206-4774 (Phone)

Harry J. Holzer

Georgetown University - Public Policy Institute (GPPI) ( email )

3600 N Street, NW Suite 200
Washington, DC 20057
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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