Not Available for Download

Regional Shifts in Pork Production: Implications for Competition and Food Safety

Posted: 1 Oct 2001  

Hayri Onal

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics

Laurian J. Unnevehr

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) - Economic Research Service (ERS)

Aleksandar Bekric

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Abstract

U.S. pork production and processing is consolidating in larger, more economically efficient units, and shifting from the Midwest into the Southeast. A regional model of farm supply and processing demand shows that smaller Midwest operations can survive only if processing capacity remains concentrated in that region. Salmonella incidence is higher in the Southeast and on larger farms. Restricting salmonella incidence in hogs delivered for processing to the minimum feasible level would increase total industry costs by 3%, due to increased production and delivery costs. It would also increase the comparative advantage of farms and processing firms in the Midwest.

Suggested Citation

Onal, Hayri and Unnevehr, Laurian J. and Bekric, Aleksandar, Regional Shifts in Pork Production: Implications for Competition and Food Safety. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 82, No. 4, November 2000. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=246810

Hayri Onal (Contact Author)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics ( email )

1301 W. Gregory Drive
307c Mumford Hall (MC-710)
Urbana, IL 61801
United States
217-333-5507 (Phone)

Laurian J. Unnevehr

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) - Economic Research Service (ERS) ( email )

355 E Street, SW
Washington, DC 20024-3221
United States
202-694-5401 (Phone)

Aleksandar Bekric

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
303